• There are so many strengths. Everything was very well thought out and organized. The activities planned were interesting to the children. I knew I was leaving my child in good hands.–SAIL Parent 2016

Below each teacher’s name are the skills addressed in her class!

Reading A – Mara Yuzwak

During the first week of SAIL, students were administered the Wilson Assessment of Decoding and Encoding (WADE) to determine their current reading and phonemic awareness levels. Notes were also taken as to student ability to decode words. Initial curriculum will be based on your student’s performance on the WADE and modifications will be made as students demonstrate their unique abilities throughout the program.

All students will be given opportunities to demonstrate their skills in a variety of ways including, but not limited to: independent work, partner and small group work, whole group work, one-to-one work with teacher via the modes of: writing, drawing, reading, speaking, and listening. This will occur through direct and indirect instruction with formal and informal assessments. Social and self-advocacy skills will be embedded throughout the curriculum. Skill focus, based on level, will include some/all of the following:

  • Letter/Sound Recognition – the ability to match a letter to its corresponding sound/sounds. We will work on each letter’s individual sound and aide students in understanding the letters that may make more than one sound (such as hard “g” in go and soft “g” in giraffe).
  • Phonemic Awareness – the ability to hear, identify, and manipulate individual sounds (phonemes) in spoken words. Awareness of how sounds work prepares students for reading print.
  • Decoding – the ability to apply knowledge of letter/sound relationships and understanding of letter patterns to correctly pronounce written words. This enables students to quickly recognize familiar words and to break down/figure out unfamiliar words.
  • Other Initial Reading Concepts – Sight Words, Consonant-Vowel-Consonant (CVC) words such as “cat” and “dog”, single syllable and multi syllabic words, open and closed syllables, digraphs (a combination of two letters representing one sound such as “ph” and “ey”) and diphthongs (a sound formed by the combination of two vowels in a single syllable, in which the sound begins as one vowel and moves toward another such as “coin” and “loud”, root/base words, pre-fixes and suffixes, contractions and rules (such as “Y” as a consonant and vowel, “ie/ei” placement).

 

Reading B – Mara Yuzwak

During the first week of SAIL, students were administered the Wilson Assessment of Decoding and Encoding (WADE) to determine their current reading and phonemic awareness levels. Notes were also taken as to student ability to decode words. Initial curriculum will be based on your student’s performance on the WADE and modifications will be made as students demonstrate their unique abilities throughout the program.

All students will be given opportunities to demonstrate their skills in a variety of ways including, but not limited to: independent work, partner and small group work, whole group work, one-to-one work with teacher via the modes of: writing, drawing, reading, speaking, and listening. This will occur through direct and indirect instruction with formal and informal assessments. Social and self-advocacy skills will be embedded throughout the curriculum. Skill focus, based on level, will include some/all of the following:

  • Decoding – the ability to apply knowledge of letter/sound relationships and understanding of letter patterns to correctly pronounce written words. This enables students to quickly recognize familiar words and to break down/figure out unfamiliar words.
  • Other Initial Reading Concepts – Sight Words, Consonant-Vowel-Consonant (CVC) words such as “cat” and “dog”, single syllable and multi syllabic words, open and closed syllables, digraphs (a combination of two letters representing one sound such as “ph” and “ey”) and diphthongs (a sound formed by the combination of two vowels in a single syllable, in which the sound begins as one vowel and moves toward another such as “coin” and “loud”, root/base words, pre-fixes and suffixes, contractions and rules (such as “Y” as a consonant and vowel, “ie/ei” placement).
  • Vocabulary – identify unfamiliar words and implement strategies such as context clues to determine their meaning.
  • Reading Elements – identify plot, character, setting, and theme

As students develop enhanced reading skills, they will be asked to perform a variety of tasks including making predictions, comparing/contrasting, and demonstrating higher level thinking skills. As most students demonstrate difficulties comprehending informational texts, an emphasis on tools/skills to break down and understand this type of text will be provided to higher level/grade learners throughout the program.

Lastly, students will have an opportunity to earn raffle tickets for reading they complete outside of class. As the program services several age/skill/grade levels, this could include your child reading to family members, chapter books, novels, and any other reading your student may complete. A note with a signature denoting reading, or a brief summary of what was read will count as credit to demonstrate outside work.

 

Reading – Meghan Hallihan

During the first week of the program, SAIL students and their teacher worked together to compile a list of various novels they were interested in reading.  After voting on book choices and placing students into classes based on reading level, the students will dive into their book clubs! While reading together in class, each student will be assigned a certain job to complete which will focus on a specific area of reading comprehension.  This will ensure a deeper student understanding of their chosen novel.  The jobs and their responsibilities (which will change daily so all students receive practice in all skill areas) are:

  • Cool Connector
    • Make 2-4 connections to that day’s reading
    • Think of text-to-self/text/world connections
    • Describe the connections in detail
  • Dynamite Discussion Director
    • Create 3-5 questions about that day’s reading
    • Use creative, open-ended questions that require more than a simple “yes” or “no” answer
  • Vocabulary Victor
    • Keep track of new and interesting words (at least 3) as we are reading
    • Determine the unknown meaning using various resources (dictionary/computer)
  • Savvy Summarizer
    • Write a summary about that day’s reading
    • Include important details in sequence
    • Use complete sentences

Other reading comprehension strategies we will cover include:

  • Character Examination:  Students will describe character traits of the various characters in their books/companion texts.
  • Making Predictions: Readers will be encouraged to constantly make predictions while reading their novel based on context clues.
  • Inferencing:  Students will draw conclusions based on text evidence and prior experiences.
  • Summarizing/Finding main idea & details:  Students will find the main idea and supporting details in various texts and will use that information to create a summary of what they have read.

 

Reading – Katie Seeley

During the first week of SAIL, students were administered the WADE (Wilson Assessment of Decoding and Encoding) to determine their level of instruction and phonics abilities. The summer program will include the NYS reading standards that are grade level appropriate. The reading instruction will be based on student results, their grade level and their ability/skill level. Some of the areas of reading that will be enforced and covered throughout the summer will include but are not limited to:

  • Vocabulary/Sight Words: Identify unfamiliar words and implement strategies such as context clues to determine their meaning
  • Decoding: The ability to apply knowledge of letter/sound relationships and understanding of letter patterns to correctly pronounce written words. This enables students to quickly recognize familiar words and to break down/figure out unfamiliar words.
  • Phonemic Awareness: The ability to hear, identify, and manipulate individual sounds (phonemes) in spoken words. Awareness of how sounds work prepares students for reading print.
  • Story Elements: The ability to identify the character(s), setting, plot, conflict, and resolution of a story.
  • Fluency: The ability to read a text accurately, quickly, and with expression.
  • Comprehension: The ability to understand and interpret what is being read.

Students’ progress will be closely monitored through daily observations and informal assessments to allow for success and the need to supplement or differentiate instruction, should a students have difficulty grasping a certain concept. Students are provided with a multisensory learning approach that is structured and predictable; students learn through repetition of taught skills.

In addition to phonics instruction, fluency (reading at a natural, smooth rate), vocabulary and comprehension are reinforced daily. Students are provided with books that range in both title topic and reading level, and will practice generalizing learned skills taught. Students will get to read both fiction and non-fiction texts and have in depth conversations on our daily reading assignments. While reading, students receive scaffolding with decoding skills, modeling of fluency, and practice with building comprehension skills.